Protecting Life From Work Stress

“Companies are using less people to fulfil the roles that remain. This is the challenge for workers in the next decade: how to remain competitive in the new world of outsourcing and offshoring. If they don’t there won’t be work.”

Matt Church Full article Here

The Solution is Evolution:

Getting more done in less time… do the math. Less people doing more … that’s inevitable. So, what are we going to do with the spare people? Less people doing more work means competition. Unfortunately, it also puts employers at a distinct advantage when it comes to employing.

Some companies I’ve worked with, particularly in the Pharma industry, opted to re-train existing people rather than hire and fire. In essence they sacked 50% and re-trained the remainder to keep competitive. The model failed. It’s cheaper, smarter and better business to create and entrepreneurial workforce with people who volunteer to work in that environment rather than spend tens of millions of dollars coaching reluctant individuals to function outside their comfort zone.

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Another reason re-training fails is because the training industry, including the HR departments who hire them, are handcuffed into partial human development that’s absolutely doomed to fail. Fragmented models of human development are a broken paradigm that is costing corporations billions of dollars each year. You can sympathise with the model, that by unspoken agreement can only work on work issues for an individual who has to manage their “whole” life. What organisation is given permission to address home life, relationships, spiritual matters? All of which highly impact the productivity, health, cost, motive, engagement, inspiration and motivation of any person. It’s the equivalent to fixing one worn out tyre on a car, and leaving the other three untouched. It leads to all or nothing strategies such as work life balance or meditation and other “time out” process that split people.

Unemployment for people like yourself who are reading this article will go up exponentially. Small business will fail and a total restructuring of global resources will mean that jobs will be less, demands will be more, and you will be pushed to the limit. Don’t expect compassion from your employer or clients. They are all under the pump to perform too.

So the real question is “how do I get more done in less time?” it’s not a luxury question, nor a matter of stress management, more leisure time or life balance. It’s a matter of competitive survival and only the fittest will make it. That’s universal and nature.

The answer to this question is either sustainable or temporary. For those trapped in the burn or bust work life balance model the immediate answer is work till you drop then take some time to recuperate. Self management moves to motivational techniques such as coffee, party and reward based drives to get things done in time. No one really cares about the human cost of motivation such as this, as long as the work gets done and the client is happy, who cares?

But that’s expensive. Work quality is, to put it mildly, during those burn or bust motivated sessions, second hand, and robotic. Creativity and heart are missing. Inspiration on the other hand works differently. It takes a long term view and is committed to constant improvement, the model is to evolve yourself. Don’t wait until you’ve GOT TO change. Evolve because you’d love to protect your life from your work. You are not your work. Some people imply that you are your work. No but maybe you are the fruits of your work. You need to protect yourself from yourself. And they way to do that is to treat yourself as a holistic human being, a real person, rather than, as the current trend of human development implies, a commodity that is independent of their family, health, spirituality, social life, mental health etc

Simply, this means taking the power back. It means doing it, no matter what “It” is, because you love it, in all areas of your life.

It’s not about work. It’s about your entire life model. The notion that you can work competitively after poor recovery, bad relationship stress, excessive carbohydrate consumption, inadequate nature time, surrendered responsibility for your spirituality, and inadequate resolution of your inner conflicts (of which there will be more and more) is a sad, and all too common training myth you’ll engage with at work.

It’s exacerbated by the rebound propositions. Angry yoga teachers, bitter meditation classes, that justify their stand against progress by eating organic vegetables, saving whales and fighting anything that implies adaptation from the stone age isn’t helping. Splitting yourself between the demands of a real job on one hand, family on the other with a paradigm that suggests 30 minutes of stretching or staring at a candle is going to reconcile matters has got to be toxic.

The solution lies in what’s being lost and working out how to bring that forward with progress to keep you healthy and happy as a loving, heart driven human. One such thing is nature. Nature deficit disorder is costing us. Richard Louv elaborates in his landmark work on the subject. We are being raped. The single ingredient that separates us from the robots that will replace most of us in the next 30 years, nature.

It’s not just parks and gardens, it’s how we think that matters. Once, when we worked hand to mouth in nature, moving dirt with our bare hands we understood how to think about things because we had no option. If it rained, and washed away our crop, there was no need for depression. If the sun came out and dried up our crop we didn’t go online to Facebook and harp on about global warming and create tee shirts. Life was real. And, it had its problems just like today. We cried and we laughed, and we had up times and down. But we weren’t perpetually angry, or subconsciously a victim, nor at the mercy of a social economics that demanded we create wealth for the sake of wealth and for no other good reason, greed.

So we are facing a new set of challenges 90% of which we could solve with that same touch we once had by recognising the solution through thinking in step with nature. In business and personal strategy, people are fighting nature and it’s a fight we will never win, even in our head.

There is a benefit to saving whales, don’t get me wrong. I’m not a whale culling advocate. But there’s a problem if we think that this environmental attachment to the past is the solution to the stresses and competitive pressures of living and working at a faster and faster pace. It isn’t. In fact it’s potentially just another issue to be stressed and tense and angry about. And angry people used to be productive people, motivated by anger used to work, but when productivity, creativity, inspiration, and ultimately separation from the automation and robotisation from our work is going to define our employability and viability in the future, it just doesn’t cut it anymore.