When Environmentalists Get it Wrong and Humans Pay

We all want to treat the ocean fairly. It is “not our domain” – which is really not true, but we do share the oceans and poor sharks are taking a hit right now for being “criminals” worse than drug dealers above the surface on dry land. Conservation is causing more sharks – that’s a good thing. But conservation of sharks on its own produces a secondary problem. That secondary problem is “how do you feed all these extra, now protected, hungry sharks?” Nobody is thinking about where they will eat and what. Take a look at the photos from greenpeace below and ask yourself about “do good environmentalism” that saves one specie because it’s a current fashion and makes them feel environmentally heroic, when this sort of thing (see photo) really means that shark numbers need to decline because their feeding environment is being eroded. This whole shark v’s human argument is being played out at beaches and in shallow water because there’s not enough tucker out there – simply you can’t change one thing and not another. There’s a balance in nature. A homeostasis that occurs without human laws. Even the human culling of sharks for soup is a part of nature’s balance. (I am not supporting the culling of sharks) – But I am saying that whether it’s a business, your personal life, family or an ocean, you can’t cherry pick and change one thing without having a good look at how that’s going to impact the rest. Everything is interconnected. It’s a universal truth. Conservation of sharks is a piece of a big story and when mass market media latch onto one part of the love of nature and forget the interrelated parts we start to get more sharks, not enough food, and humans being eaten. I doubt that is what the environmentalist want. So, maybe we need to deal with the less fashionable and more morose issues of making sure there’s enough food for the sharks. Who’s ready to stop eating deep see fish? Not me

Whaling Expedition (Southern Ocean - 1999)

Diver Joel Gonzaga of the the Philippine purse seiner 'Vergene' at work using only a single air compressor hose to the surface, in and around a skipjack tuna purse seine net, in the international waters of high seas pocket No1.
Diver Joel Gonzaga of the the Philippine purse seiner ‘Vergene’ at work using only a single air compressor hose to the surface, in and around a skipjack tuna purse seine net, in the international waters of high seas pocket No1.
Adult brown pelicans wait in a holding pen to be cleaned by volunteers at the Fort Jackson International Bird Rescue Research Center in Buras. Members of the Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research team work to clean birds covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead disaster. The BP leased Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded on April 20 and sank after burning.
Adult brown pelicans wait in a holding pen to be cleaned by volunteers at the Fort Jackson International Bird Rescue Research Center in Buras. Members of the Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research team work to clean birds covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead disaster. The BP leased Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded on April 20 and sank after burning.